2019 NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing – Call for Nominations in Astronomy

Annual Reviews is pleased to sponsor the 2019 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Award for Scientific Reviewing presented in Astronomy.

The NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing has been presented annually since 1979 to recognize authors, whose reviews have synthesized extensive and difficult material, rendering a significant service to science and influencing the course of scientific thought. The field rotates among biological, physical, and social sciences.

The NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing was established in 1977 by the gift of Annual Reviews and the Institute for Scientific Information in honor of J. Murray Luck (our founder). The award is currently sponsored entirely by Annual Reviews.

The 2019 award recognizes authors who, through their conceptual consideration and review of the field, have both rendered a significant service to science and had a profound influence on the course of scientific thought.

To nominate a review author in the field of Astronomy, you must submit your application by October 1st, 2018.

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and the benefit of society. To find out how we create our highly cited reviews and stimulate discussion about science, please watch this short video.

The NAS is a private, nonprofit society of distinguished scholars. Established by an Act of Congress, signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, the NAS is charged with providing independent, objective advice to the nation on matters related to science and technology. The NAS is committed to furthering science in America, and its members are active contributors to the international scientific community.

Mass Incarceration’s Collateral Damage

Homelessness, unemployment, higher debt rates, poor health for both the formerly incarcerated and their families, disengagement from community life and isolation… There is plenty of evidence that jail time causes social damage in the United States, which accentuates inequalities because it affects poor people of color disproportionately. The US has the highest imprisonment rate of the developed world and a complex criminal justice system, yet data on the mechanisms by which mass incarceration generates harm on this scale are surprisingly hard to come by.

In their article “Collateral Consequences of Punishment: A Critical Review and Path Forward,” in the first volume of the Annual Review of Criminology, David S. Kirk, of the University of Oxford, and Sara Wakefield, of Rutgers University, argue that imprisonment rates and confinement conditions vary significantly across states. “These differences are not well understood or systematically documented but likely influence the scope, magnitude, and character of collateral consequences,” they write.

The federal system, for example, houses only 13 percent of all prisoners, half of whom are sentenced on drug-related charges. “Crimmigration”, the portmanteau for immigration and criminal law, is also on the rise in the federal system, although this hike “reflects an increasing punitiveness toward immigrants rather than a growth in the crime rate among immigrants.” In contrast, the jail system houses the higher number of prisoners, and the state system has 53% of its inmates locked in for violent crimes. Given the differences between the two systems on post-incarceration consequences, the authors believe contrasting the data could lead to a better grasp on the stakes of imprisonment: “Unfortunately, comparisons across different types of confinement are nearly impossible to accomplish with available data.”

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Kirk & Wakefield, 2018. Annual Review of Criminology.

“Crimmigration” policies have become stricter under the Trump administration, as the threshold for deportation has dropped considerably, and any alleged criminal offender is set for deportation upon arrest, regardless of conviction. Detained migrant children are also an urgent topic of research, as the number of unaccompanied children apprehended by US Border Patrol has been growing steadily. Evidence shows their detainment has similar characteristics to typical imprisonment, and they endure the same suspected cases of verbal, physical, sexual abuse and human rights violations. There are no systematic investigations of the consequences of these conditions on detained children and their families, one of the reasons the authors recommend that immigration be made a more central focus of the collateral consequence research agenda.

The authors argue the consequences of the crime, such as imprisonment, should be studied separately from consequences of the punishment itself, like difficulties finding employment. They also think the impact of specific types of prison and the conditions of confinement need to be examined. They advocate for the creation of more robust databases compiling all the information on the inmates, during and after their time in jail.

They recommend looking to Europe, specifically Nordic countries, for a model of continuing information collection that tracks inmates and their families. These nations use a national registration system that allows for cross-referencing data on an individual’s crime and punishment with, e.g., their education and family status.

Read more in the first volume of the Annual Review of Criminology.

Professor Karen S. Cook elected as new Chair of the Annual Reviews Board of Directors

Karen S. Cook, the Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology; Director of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences; Vice-Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity at Stanford University; and Class V Secretary, National Academy of Sciences, has been unanimously elected to the role of Chair of the Board at Annual Reviews, effective June 1, 2018.

Dr. Cook has served as Co-Editor of the Annual Review of Sociology since 1998, and as Vice-Chair of the Annual Reviews Board of Directors since 2010, a position also held by Dr. Sandra M. Faber, Professor and Astronomer, University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr. Cook conducts research on social interaction, social networks, social exchange, and trust. She has authored and co-authored numerous reviews and papers, as well as edited a number of books in the Russell Sage Foundation Trust Series.

She succeeds Professor Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, who has led the Board for 23 years, from 1995 to 2018. Professor Zare also served as the Co-Editor of the Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry from 2006 to 2010. He has co-authored numerous reviews, including two autobiographies. Professor Zare is renowned for his research in the area of laser chemistry, which has led to numerous awards and honors.

During his tenure, in partnership with Dr. Samuel Gubins, President and Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of Annual Reviews (1995 to 2015), Professor Zare expanded Annual Reviews to many fields while maintaining the highest standards. Annual Reviews continues to be a unique and impactful publisher as a result of his guidance and leadership.

Dr. Richard Gallagher, President and Editor-in-Chief of Annual Reviews, said,

“Passing the baton from Dick to Karen offers a seamless progression of leadership for our Board. Dick’s long-lasting passion for and contributions to our mission—to synthesize scientific knowledge so that investigators can plan new and impactful research directions—will continue through a new lecture series named in his honor and his ongoing participation in the Board. The role of Board Chair is now in another pair of excellent hands. On behalf of the Board, Editorial Committees, and staff of Annual Reviews, I congratulate Karen and look forward to continuing our working relationship for many years to come.” 

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge to stimulate the progress of science and benefit society. For more than 85 years, Annual Reviews has offered expert review journals which today span 50 titles across the biomedical, life, physical, and social sciences.  Annual Reviews launched Knowable Magazine in 2017, an open access digital magazine to explore the real-world significance of this highly cited scholarship and make it accessible to broad audiences.

 

 

Professor Stanley Falkow – 1934-2018 – father of molecular microbial pathogenesis

It is with sadness that we share the news that Professor Stanley Falkow of Stanford University School of Medicine, esteemed member of the editorial committee for the Annual Review of Microbiology, co-author of three review articles and an autobiographical article,  passed away (5th May 2018) at the age of 84.

Those of us who didn’t know Professor Falkow can get a vivid impression of him by reading his autobiographical article entitled: The Fortunate Professor. The title makes it clear that this was a man with an abundance of gratitude. The abstract of his article says simply:

My professional life can be summarized by a quote from the Talmud.

Much have I learned from my teachers,

More from my colleagues,

But most from my students.

It is the fortunate professor who learns from the student.

All of us at Annual Reviews feel equally fortunate to have Professor Falkow play a part in the success of our organization. Our thoughts go out to his family, friends, co-workers and of course his students, from whom he learned so much.

Quick Abstracts from Google Scholar – find and filter articles on the go!

Thanks to an innovation from Google Scholar called Quick Abstracts, it’s now easier to use your phone to find and filter through scholarly articles on the go.

Clicking a Scholar search result on your smartphone now opens a quick preview which you can swipe to browse through abstracts. When you find content that helps answer your query, you can click through to Annual Reviews for the full-text. Access is via subscription or pay per view. Note: the Annual Review of Public Health is Open Access, freely available to read, reuse and share.

Many of us use our phones in nearly every aspect of our daily lives, so it’s handy to also have this new feature. We’re delighted to be part of this endeavor which is aimed at helping researchers reach content more quickly, wherever they are.

Congratulations to Adriaan Bax, winner of the 2018 NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing

Congratulations Adriaan Bax, PhD. of @NIH.gov, recipient of National Academy of Sciences Award for Scientific Reviewing which is sponsored by us!

Bax is honored for reviews and pioneering technical concept pieces on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance that have greatly influenced the field of #StructuralBiology.

To celebrate this achievement, we’ve made the PDF of one of his seminal articles entitled Two-Dimensional NMR and Protein Structure freely available to download here: http://arevie.ws/nasbax

The award will be presented during the 155th NAS Annual Meeting on Sunday, April 29, 2018.

More information on Bax and the Award – http://arevie.ws/nasaward18

Celebrating 85 years of service!

To mark our 85th anniversary, free online access to all journal articles published in 2017 is available through the end of the year.
Please browse journals that are new to you and revisit those that you rely on regularly. You may access articles via HTML directly. PDF access available via institutional or individual subscription, or pay per view purchase.

How well do you know Annual Reviews?
We got our start in the late 1920s when founder J. Murray Luck, Professor of Biochemistry at Stanford University, set out to review current research in the (then) emerging field of biochemistry, and found himself “dismayed … by the immensity of the task…” He asked leading professors in the field to write intelligent syntheses of the key primary literature.
In 1932, he published the first volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry. It has become a foundational resource for relevant topics, enabling further discovery. Take a look today and revisit the science of yesterday, still relevant today:

Annual Review of Biochemistry, Volume 1, 1932
Permeability
The Metabolism of Brain and Nerve

Fast Forward to 2017: Scientific Literature Reviewed, from A to V
Today we publish 50 journals covering disciplines within the biomedical, life, physical, and social sciences, from Analytical Chemistry to Vision Science. Each journal provides a pathway to the relevant primary research across a number of topics within the field. Our authors critically examine a wide array of articles, papers, and books to provide objective overviews and summarize important ideas and findings.

We’ve recently added the following journals to our collection:

  • Cancer Biology
  • Vision Science
  • Linguistics
  • Virology
  • Statistics and Its Application
  • Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior
  • Animal Biosciences
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  • Marine Science
  • Economics
  • Financial Economics
  • Resource Economics

Publishing in 2018:

  • Biomedical Data Science
  • Control, Robotics, and Autonomous Systems
  • Criminology

Celebrate our 85th anniversary by revisiting your favorite Annual Review, or getting acquainted with a new title! Either way, Annual Reviews provides researchers with curated wisdom from hand-picked experts.

Happy OA Week – from the Annual Review of Public Health

Every year for the last ten years, many within the research community have chosen to celebrate Open Access during October. That time is here again!

This seems like a good moment to remind everyone that the 2017 volume of the Annual Review of Public Health is now freely available to read, reuse and share thanks to generous support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. All the back volumes are also freely available.

Since opening the content in April, usage has soared to new heights and we’re delighted that so many more people can benefit from the expert knowledge contained within this highly cited journal.

The theme of this year’s OA week is “open in order to…” and this image seems tailor made for us. Thanks to the good folks at the Open Access Week website for the resource (there are many more to share here).

Annual Reviews appoints Eva Emerson to lead new digital magazine

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that Eva Emerson has been appointed editor to lead a digital publication called Knowable Magazine from Annual Reviews set to launch on October 26th 2017 at the World Conference of Science Journalists in San Francisco, CA. Eva has an outstanding track record in the communication of science, having most recently served as Editor of Science News.

Richard Gallagher, President and Editor-In-Chief said:

“Eva’s journalistic talent, digital publishing expertise and significant leadership ability make her a natural fit for this position. We’re delighted she has joined this innovative project in Annual Reviews’ 85th year of service to the research community.”

Knowable Magazine will use various forms of storytelling to explore the life, physical, and social sciences. Review articles from the Annual Review journals serve as springboards for journalistic pieces in Knowable Magazine, including in-depth features, explainers, and even comics. The online-only magazine will focus on explaining the real-world significance of research, punctuated with forays into the wonder of the world around us. This initiative receives support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

“Annual Reviews was founded to help scientists keep abreast of what was even then considered an overwhelming amount of relevant literature,” Eva says. “Its role is to synthesize understandings revealed in individual research articles into something larger – emerging trends, insights, analyses — and to articulate where scientific progress stands now, from the point of view of scientists working in their fields. Taking advantage of the digital space, the new magazine aims to reveal such milestones to a broad audience in compelling ways.”

A native of Los Angeles, Eva brings over 20 years of experience in science communication to the Annual Reviews team. As Managing Editor and then Editor in Chief of Science News, she helped to oversee a shift to daily digital journalism, the creation of a robust website and huge growth in social media followers. She is delighted to join nonprofit Annual Reviews. “We want to elevate intelligent, informed discourse. This feels especially urgent right now, given the erosion of public trust in facts that the Internet enables and thrives on.”

About the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation: The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation fosters path-breaking scientific discovery, environmental conservation, patient care improvements and preservation of the special character of the Bay Area. Visit Moore.org and follow @MooreFound.

About the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation: The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is a philanthropic, not-for-profit grant making institution based in New York City. Founded in 1934 by industrialist Alfred P. Sloan Jr, the Foundation supports original research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics.

About Annual Reviews: Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and benefit of society.  Journalists who require further information, access to our content or press contacts can visit the Press Center.