Annual Reviews appoints Lindzi Wessel as Reporter for new digital magazine

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that Lindzi Wessel has been appointed Reporter for the new digital magazine, set to launch in Fall 2017. Editor Eva Emerson welcomed her, saying:

I am delighted that Lindzi has joined our small but growing team. As hire number three, she will help to create stories that bridge the gap between our expert reviews and the needs of a wider general audience for engaging and accurate information that explains how science shapes our lives.

Lindzi joins us straight from an internship at Science Magazine as a news and feature writer and has published with STAT and The San Jose Mercury News among others. She is a graduate of the UC Santa Cruz Science Communication program and holds a master’s in neuroscience from UC Davis. 

The new digital magazine will explore the real-world significance of research covered in Annual Reviews journals in a compelling and accessible way. Mirroring the scope of the journals themselves, the content will be freely available to anyone to read and reuse, and will attract those who wish to stay abreast of progress in research in the natural and social sciences. This initiative receives support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and benefit of society. Please visit the Annual Reviews Press Center to sign up for media-only access to journal content.

2018 NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing – Call for Nominations in Structural Biology

Annual Reviews is pleased to sponsor the 2018 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Award for Scientific Reviewing, presented in Structural Biology.

The NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing has been presented annually since 1979 to recognize authors, whose reviews have synthesized extensive and difficult material, rendering a significant service to science and influencing the course of scientific thought. The field rotates among biological, physical, and social sciences.

The NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing was established in 1977 by the gift of Annual Reviews and the Institute for Scientific Information in honor of J. Murray Luck. The award is currently sponsored entirely by Annual Reviews.

The 2018 award recognizes authors who, through their conceptual consideration and review of the field, have both rendered a significant service to science and had a profound influence on the course of scientific thought. This year’s selection committee seeks nominations of those who have written reviews or technical concept pieces that have led to revolutionary advances to the development of methods in the field of structural biology. These areas include, but are not necessarily limited to: X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic spectroscopy, small angle x-ray scattering, mass spectrometry, light microscopy, computation, and single molecule studies.

To nominate a review author in the field of Structural Biology, you must submit your application by Monday, October 2nd, 2017.

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and the benefit of society. To find out how we create our highly cited reviews and stimulate discussion about science, please watch this short video.

The NAS is a private, nonprofit society of distinguished scholars. Established by an Act of Congress, signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, the NAS is charged with providing independent, objective advice to the nation on matters related to science and technology. The NAS is committed to furthering science in America, and its members are active contributors to the international scientific community.

The Edifying Beauty of Geysers

Old Faithful Geyser erupts on a clear winter day in Yellowstone National Park (Credit: Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service. Public domain.)

Geysers are a rare occurrence. There are only about 1,000 of them in the world, half of which are located in the United States’ Yellowstone National Park. They also take different forms, with varying frequencies, sizes, or lengths of eruption. Despite over 200 years of study, they are still poorly understood, but scientists persist in their exploration: geyser processes provide a scale model for the processes of volcanic eruptions, and they could give us clues on how to predict and prepare for such events.

In the 2017 Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Shaul Hurwitz, of the U.S. Geological Survey, and Michael Manga, of the University of California, Berkeley, discuss the current state of the science on geysers. They also delineate the questions that must yet be answered. The article, titled “The Fascinating and Complex Dynamics of Geyser Eruptions,” was highlighted by the U.S. Geological Survey.

They examine the geography and geology of geysers, their chemistry, the dynamics of their eruption. They ask why some erupt continuously and others only from time to time, why some erupt at great heights and others don’t, why some erupt regularly and other unpredictably.

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and the benefit of society. To find out how we create our highly cited reviews and stimulate discussion about science, please watch this short video. Journalists and bloggers who require journal access, please visit our Press Center.

Board Member Sandra Faber receives 2017 Gruber Foundation Cosmology Prize

Annual Reviews is fortunate to have many scientific luminaries serving on its Board of Directors. One of these is Professor and Astronomer Sandra Faber, who is the Board’s Vice-Chairperson, and Co-Editor of the Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics. We are delighted to announce that today she has won the prestigious Gruber Foundation Cosmology Prize for her groundbreaking studies of the structure, dynamics, and evolution of galaxies.

Computer simulation of a galaxy. Credit: Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics.

Among the key accomplishments of her more than four decades of research is pioneering work on the study of dark matter and its relationship to formation of galaxies, and the demonstration that black holes reside at the heart of most large galaxies. She has also made significant contributions to innovations in telescope technology that have revolutionized modern astronomy.

Sandra, who is Professor Emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Astronomer Emerita of the University of California Observatories believes that “Astronomical knowledge is probably the most important single discipline that you need to know in order to be an informed citizen of earth.”

Please join us in congratulating Professor Sandra Faber on this award celebrating her extraordinary achievements in Astronomy.

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and the benefit of society. To find out how we create our highly cited reviews and stimulate discussion about science, please watch this short video. Journalists and bloggers who require journal access, please visit our Press Center.

Annual Reviews appoints Rosie Mestel Deputy Editor of new digital magazine

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that Rosie Mestel has been appointed Deputy Editor of the new digital magazine, set to launch in Fall 2017. Editor Eva Emerson welcomed her, saying:

“I am thrilled to have Rosie on the team. She will play a leading role in the creation and development of the magazine. She brings an impressive resume as well as considerable enthusiasm to this new endeavor.”

Rosie was formerly the Chief Magazine Editor of Nature, running the journalism group. Before that, she worked at the Los Angeles Times as a reporter and then editor of science and health. She earned a PhD in genetics before switching careers and earning a certificate in science communication from UC Santa Cruz.

The new digital magazine will explore the real-world significance of research covered in Annual Reviews journals in a compelling and accessible way. Mirroring the scope of the journals themselves, the content will be freely available to anyone to read and reuse, and will attract those who wish to stay abreast of progress in research in the natural and social sciences. This initiative receives support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and benefit of society. Please visit the Annual Reviews Press Center to arrange an interview or sign up for media-only access to journal content.

 

 

The NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing goes to Daniel S. Nagin!

Yesterday, Daniel S. Nagin, the Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics at Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University, USA, and a Committee Member of the Annual Review of Criminology (which will publish in 2018), was awarded the 2017 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Award for Scientific Reviewing sponsored by us! Eva Emerson, Senior Editor (forthcoming digital magazine), and Samuel Gubins, Editor-in-Chief Emeritus, attended the ceremony in Washington D.C, USA.

Daniel S. Nagin with his award, flanked by NAS leaders.

Dr. Nagin was honored for exemplary reviews of the scientific literature on the crime-prevention effects of criminal and civil sanctions. These reviews have altered the course of criminological theory and empirical research, and have greatly informed analysis of public policy.

During his acceptance speech, Dr. Nagin reminded the audience of the importance of scientific reviews to the progress of science. He also said that the reporting of new results and the “synthesis of extant knowledge are both creative acts in their own right.”

His work appears in many leading publications, including Annual Reviews, which is publishing an article and response from him in the 2017 volume of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science.

new_logoAnnual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and the benefit of society. To find out how we create our highly cited reviews and stimulate discussion about science, please watch this short video.

The NAS is a private, nonprofit society of distinguished scholars. Established by an Act of Congress, signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, the NAS is charged with providing independent, objective advice to the nation on matters related to science and technology. The NAS is committed to furthering science in America, and its members are active contributors to the international scientific community.

Treasure trove of expert Public Health content now publicly available – what’s inside?

Today (and every day!) we want to encourage those in the Public Health community and beyond to freely explore the expert content published in the Annual Review of Public Health over the last 37 years. No matter who you are, what you do or where you work, if you have access to the internet then you can now freely read all the articles and read, share and re-use those from the 2017 volume. Support for this initiative to increase openness and transparency in research is provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Let’s start our journey by picking a newsworthy and important topic. Take Gun Violence, which is of particular significance within the USA. An initial search reveals that the Annual Review of Public Health has published 35 articles of relevance to this topic.

A first observation is the sheer breadth of topics that are covered: from measures to deter gun violence and keep firearms away from high risk individuals to the effects of pervasive media violence and the emerging practice of legal epidemiology. It’s also immediately clear that the authors are thought leaders in their fields working at leading institutions such as Carnegie Mellon; John Hopkins; UCLA; University of Glasgow; McGill University; the Norwegian Institute of Public Health; Utrecht University and more.

From this starting point, it’s possible to explore the content in greater depth. For example, the article entitled “Cure Violence: a public health model to reduce gun violence” from the Annual Review of Public Health (March 2015) sounds intriguing and it is. Here’s an excerpt:

Cureviolence.org, @CureViolence

“Cure Violence (formerly known as Chicago CeaseFire) seeks to create individual-level and community-level change in communities where it is a norm for young people to carry a gun and—for some—to use a gun to settle various forms of conflict. The Cure Violence (CV) model attempts to stop the transmission of violence in a manner similar to that of public health interventions designed to curtail epidemics or to reduce the impact of harmful behavior such as smoking and overeating. The CV model identifies the individuals most at risk of spreading gun violence, and it intervenes to change their behavior and attitudes. Next, it tries to demonstrate to those individuals, and to the broader community, that there are more acceptable and less harmful ways to resolve personal conflicts and disputes. The CV model does not involve the use of force or the threat of punishment. It presumes that violent behavior—like all behavior—responds to structures, incentives, and norms”.

From this article, we took a detour beyond Annual Reviews and paused for a while to watch this video:

Returning to Annual Reviews, in addition to in-depth writing, multi-media options are available to help visual learners gain a deeper understanding, for example this animated video about patterns of gun violence in the United States.

Many articles also feature clear diagrams, figures, and illustrations that help explain key concepts and all contain links to other Annual Reviews articles that can be initially explored.

We hope this short tour encourages everyone to explore their access to the Annual Review of Public Health. We welcome feedback via Twitter, Facebook or as a comment to this post. Enjoy!