Waves, Satellites, and an Oceanographer at Sea: Annual Review of Marine Science Volume 10

Browse the Annual Review of Marine Science Volume 10 table of contents.

ma10-wavesThe Fate and Impact of Internal Waves in Nearshore Ecosystems” by C.B. Woodson introduced me to the wonder and science of internal waves.  Like the surface waves most people are accustomed to thinking about, these internal waves also break as they near land and can bring of deep offshore waters into the nearshore environment:

These deeper waters are often colder, lower in oxygen, higher in CO2 concentration (lower pH), and nutrient enriched. Consequently, internal waves can dramatically change the ambient environment, leading to either extreme oxygen (hypoxia) or pH (acidification) events. However, they can also mediate extreme heating events by providing a temporary reprieve from high temperatures. Deep offshore waters can also provide nutrients and food subsidies to nearshore ecosystems. Nutrient-deprived nearshore ecosystems, namely coral reefs, can be highly dependent on such subsidies.

ma-dugdaleRichard Dugdale credits mentoring with influencing his path from electrical engineering to oceanographer in his autobiography “A Biogeochemical Oceanographer at Sea: My Life with Nitrogen and a Nod to Silica” He has a warm writing style and I enjoyed reading about the history of this field through his experiences, especially about the changing technology:

…this field rapidly developed both analytically, starting with the use of stable and radioactive tracers, and computationally, from the use of slide rules to the development of onboard computers with disk drives (with 250 KB of storage!) and the era of smartphones. Also changing has been the mode of communication between oceanographers—from handwritten or mimeographed notes to faxes to the early email and Internet (telemail) used by oceanographers in the 1980s to today’s email and social media. What follows, then, is a biased (biological/chemical) history of a period in which modern oceanography was largely developed and in which I had the great fortune to be a player.

Spaceborne Lidar in the Study of Marine Systems” by Hostetler et al. is one of several articles in this volume that report on the use of satellites in marine research. This article reviews the use of passive color analysis to observe chlorophyll levels among many other topics and looks forward to an upcoming PACE mission which pairs the color observations with new tools:

Satellite passive ocean color observations have vastly improved our understanding of global links between biodiversity, ecosystem structure, and ma10-satsecological and biogeochemical function. However, there are fundamental geophysical properties that simply cannot be characterized with ocean color technology alone. Addressing these issues requires additional tools in space. For example, the Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, and Marine Ecosystem (PACE) mission aims to co-deploy a multi-angle polarimeter with a hyperspectral ocean color sensor, with the polarimetry enabling more accurate atmospheric corrections and advanced characterization of ocean particle types. Here, we describe how even greater synergies may be achieved by combining a passive ocean color sensor with an ocean-optimized satellite profiling lidar.

 

Annual Review of Psychology Volume 69: Language, Gender, and Replication

Browse the Annual Review of Psychology Volume 69 table of contents.

ps69-langWhile I’m used to thinking about language as a way of gauging cognitive development “Linking Language and Cognition in Infancy” by Perszyk and Waxman had me thinking about the ways language influences cognition. For instance:

…more recent developmental evidence reveals that, even before infants begin to speak, words invite them to form categories. The evidence for this claim comes from a robust behavioral paradigm, elegant in its simplicity. It is essentially an object categorization task with two phases. During the familiarization phase, infants view a series of discriminably different objects (e.g., dog, horse, duck) from a given object category (e.g., animal). Next, during the test phase, infants view two new objects—one a member of the now-familiar category (e.g., a cat) and the other a member of an entirely different category (e.g., an apple). The logic of this paradigm is straightforward: If infants detect the category-based commonalities among the familiarization objects, then they should distinguish the novel test image from the familiar; if they fail to detect these commonalities, then they should perform at chance levels ….The evidence reveals that, by 12 months of age, even before they produce more than a few words on their own, infants have established a principled link between object naming and object categorization.

I found  “Gender Stereotypes” by Ellemers  quite an interesting read.  I particularly responded to the summation in the section “How We Can Benefit From This Knowledge”:

Gender stereotypes prevent women and men from equally sharing the care for children and family members and from equally benefiting from the interpersonal connections made through these activities. Gender stereotypes prevent women with successful careers from finding a romantic partner and men without employment from feeling valued. They cause us to underestimate the emotional burden of care functions for women and the physical burden of strenuous labor for men. This is not only costly for the individuals ps69-genderinvolved but also for society, as it impacts the psychological and physical well-being of individuals, the resilience of families, and the long-term availability and contributions of workers in the labor market. We are only human and have to accept that we are subject to stereotypical thinking and gendered expectations. Accepting our fallibility in this way, rather than denying that gender stereotypes play a role while implicitly reproducing them, makes it easier to correct for any undesired outcomes that may result.

Shrout and Rodgers’ article “ Psychology, Science, and Knowledge Construction: Broadening Perspectives from the Replication Crisis” is a good overview of the history of evaluating results, the problems with current practices, and steps that have been taken to verify findings.  I was particularly interested in how the changes in research procedure have affected scientists:

As calls have been made to change the way science is conducted in psychology by preregistering designs and analyses and increasing sample sizes, some authors have noted what might be called collateral damage. The three types of damage that have been identified are (a) slowing and ultimate reduction of new findings and phenomena, (b) penalizing different subfields with the imposition of one-size-fits-all norms, and (c) discouraging young scientists from staying in the field because of the higher bar for publication and professional advancement.

Fire, Explosions, and Lymphatic Systems: Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics Volume 50

Browse the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics Volume 50 table of contents.

Before I get to the fire and explosions I want to highlight the lovely article “John Leask Lumley: Whither Turbulence?” by Leibovich and Warhaft that begins this volume.  This biography includes sections about Dr. Lumley’s love and appreciation for vintage cars and good food and wine as well as a look at his contributions to fluid mechanics. It’s a remarkable tribute and a worthwhile read.

Tohidi, Gollner, and Xiao wrote “Fire Whirls” which I found myself thinking about as I watched coverage of the California wildfires:

fl50-fire whirls

Throughout the literature, fire whirls have been identified by a variety of names, including devil, tornado, twister, whirlwind, or even dragon twist (Japanese). Regardless of the name, when the right combination of wind and fire interact, the result is an intensification of combustion with whirling flames that we call the fire whirl. Although the fire whirl or fire tornado shares some features with its atmospheric counterparts, it remains distinct in its source of buoyancy, combusting fuel, structure, and formation patterns. In nature, fire whirls are most often observed in mass fires. These include both large wildland (also known as forest fires or bushfires) and urban conflagrations, such as the burning of cities or towns…

fl50-detonationWhile action movie explosions make it seem easy, a controlled detonation that accomplishes more than looking good on film is difficult and complex to model. “High Explosive Detonation-Conifer Interactions” by Short and Quirk begins by explaining some of the complexity:

The dynamics of a given HE–confiner system depend on the pressure-loading properties of the explosive (magnitude and timescale), while in turn the structure and speed of the detonation reaction zone and the lateral confinement of explosive products are dependent on the material properties of the confining material, such as its density and sound speed. The ability to predict the motion of a detonation in an explosive system (known as the timing) and the response of the confiner to the HE detonation pressure loading depend on our ability to model and understand this detonation–confiner flow coupling…

I found “Lymphatic System Flows” by Moore and Bertram quite interesting especially as it explained the importance of several organs I’d always been curious about:

The lymphatic system as a functional whole includes several organs whose association as a system is not readily apparent. Lymphoid organs include the spleen, thymus, and tonsils; another vital component is the bone marrow where white cells are manufactured…. Functionally, the lymphatic vascular systemfl50-lymph runs in parallel to the blood venous system, in that both return fluids centrally. Lymphatic vessels carry lymph, which is largely water gathered from interstitial tissue spaces. Fluid appears in the interstitial spaces because blood capillary walls are somewhat leaky, allowing part of the aqueous component of blood to escape, along with some proteins…. The lymphatic vascular system scavenges this water and protein, ultimately returning it to the venous circulation via junctions with the subclavian veins at shoulder level. The maintenance of the interstitial milieu is one of its vital functions; if fluid is not returned to the blood system at the same rate as it leaves, the painful and debilitating condition of edema can develop.

Congratulations to Adriaan Bax, winner of the 2018 NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing

Congratulations Adriaan Bax, PhD. of @NIH.gov, recipient of National Academy of Sciences Award for Scientific Reviewing which is sponsored by us!

Bax is honored for reviews and pioneering technical concept pieces on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance that have greatly influenced the field of #StructuralBiology.

To celebrate this achievement, we’ve made the PDF of one of his seminal articles entitled Two-Dimensional NMR and Protein Structure freely available to download here: http://arevie.ws/nasbax

The award will be presented during the 155th NAS Annual Meeting on Sunday, April 29, 2018.

More information on Bax and the Award – http://arevie.ws/nasaward18

Celebrating 85 years of service!

To mark our 85th anniversary, free online access to all journal articles published in 2017 is available through the end of the year.
Please browse journals that are new to you and revisit those that you rely on regularly. You may access articles via HTML directly. PDF access available via institutional or individual subscription, or pay per view purchase.

How well do you know Annual Reviews?
We got our start in the late 1920s when founder J. Murray Luck, Professor of Biochemistry at Stanford University, set out to review current research in the (then) emerging field of biochemistry, and found himself “dismayed … by the immensity of the task…” He asked leading professors in the field to write intelligent syntheses of the key primary literature.
In 1932, he published the first volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry. It has become a foundational resource for relevant topics, enabling further discovery. Take a look today and revisit the science of yesterday, still relevant today:

Annual Review of Biochemistry, Volume 1, 1932
Permeability
The Metabolism of Brain and Nerve

Fast Forward to 2017: Scientific Literature Reviewed, from A to V
Today we publish 50 journals covering disciplines within the biomedical, life, physical, and social sciences, from Analytical Chemistry to Vision Science. Each journal provides a pathway to the relevant primary research across a number of topics within the field. Our authors critically examine a wide array of articles, papers, and books to provide objective overviews and summarize important ideas and findings.

We’ve recently added the following journals to our collection:

  • Cancer Biology
  • Vision Science
  • Linguistics
  • Virology
  • Statistics and Its Application
  • Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior
  • Animal Biosciences
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  • Marine Science
  • Economics
  • Financial Economics
  • Resource Economics

Publishing in 2018:

  • Biomedical Data Science
  • Control, Robotics, and Autonomous Systems
  • Criminology

Celebrate our 85th anniversary by revisiting your favorite Annual Review, or getting acquainted with a new title! Either way, Annual Reviews provides researchers with curated wisdom from hand-picked experts.

Annual Reviews appoints Eva Emerson to lead new digital magazine

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that Eva Emerson has been appointed editor to lead a digital publication called Knowable Magazine from Annual Reviews set to launch on October 26th 2017 at the World Conference of Science Journalists in San Francisco, CA. Eva has an outstanding track record in the communication of science, having most recently served as Editor of Science News.

Richard Gallagher, President and Editor-In-Chief said:

“Eva’s journalistic talent, digital publishing expertise and significant leadership ability make her a natural fit for this position. We’re delighted she has joined this innovative project in Annual Reviews’ 85th year of service to the research community.”

Knowable Magazine will use various forms of storytelling to explore the life, physical, and social sciences. Review articles from the Annual Review journals serve as springboards for journalistic pieces in Knowable Magazine, including in-depth features, explainers, and even comics. The online-only magazine will focus on explaining the real-world significance of research, punctuated with forays into the wonder of the world around us. This initiative receives support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

“Annual Reviews was founded to help scientists keep abreast of what was even then considered an overwhelming amount of relevant literature,” Eva says. “Its role is to synthesize understandings revealed in individual research articles into something larger – emerging trends, insights, analyses — and to articulate where scientific progress stands now, from the point of view of scientists working in their fields. Taking advantage of the digital space, the new magazine aims to reveal such milestones to a broad audience in compelling ways.”

A native of Los Angeles, Eva brings over 20 years of experience in science communication to the Annual Reviews team. As Managing Editor and then Editor in Chief of Science News, she helped to oversee a shift to daily digital journalism, the creation of a robust website and huge growth in social media followers. She is delighted to join nonprofit Annual Reviews. “We want to elevate intelligent, informed discourse. This feels especially urgent right now, given the erosion of public trust in facts that the Internet enables and thrives on.”

About the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation: The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation fosters path-breaking scientific discovery, environmental conservation, patient care improvements and preservation of the special character of the Bay Area. Visit Moore.org and follow @MooreFound.

About the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation: The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is a philanthropic, not-for-profit grant making institution based in New York City. Founded in 1934 by industrialist Alfred P. Sloan Jr, the Foundation supports original research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics.

About Annual Reviews: Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and benefit of society.  Journalists who require further information, access to our content or press contacts can visit the Press Center.

 

 

 

Annual Reviews appoints Rosie Mestel Deputy Editor of new digital magazine

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that Rosie Mestel has been appointed Deputy Editor of the new digital magazine, set to launch on October 26th 2017 at the World Conference of Science Journalists in San Francisco, CA. Editor Eva Emerson welcomed her, saying:

“I am thrilled to have Rosie on the team. She will play a leading role in the creation and development of the magazine. She brings an impressive resume as well as considerable enthusiasm to this new endeavor.”

Rosie was formerly the Chief Magazine Editor of Nature, running the journalism group. Before that, she worked at the Los Angeles Times as a reporter and then editor of science and health. She earned a PhD in genetics before switching careers and earning a certificate in science communication from UC Santa Cruz.

Knowable Magazine will use various forms of storytelling to explore the life, physical, and social sciences. Review articles from the Annual Review journals serve as springboards for journalistic pieces in Knowable Magazine, including in-depth features, explainers, and even comics. The online-only magazine will focus on explaining the real-world significance of research, punctuated with forays into the wonder of the world around us. This initiative receives support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and benefit of society. Please visit the Annual Reviews Press Center to arrange an interview or sign up for media-only access to journal content.