Knowable Magazine From Annual Reviews – launches @WCSJ17

It’s all systems go as we prepare to launch Knowable Magazine from Annual Reviews at the World Conference of Science Journalists (WCSJ) which starts on October 26 in San Francisco. Our new digital magazine is supported by generous grants from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Knowable Magazine will explore the real-world significance of scholarly research, punctuated with forays into wonder and awe. Review articles written by leading scholars from the nearly 50 Annual Review journals serve as springboards for stories in the online-only magazine. Through in-depth features, explainers, articles, essays, interviews, infographics, slideshows and comics, Knowable Magazine bridges the gap between review articles written by invited experts and the information needs of a broader audience.

Knowable Magazine Editor, Eva Emerson, formerly of Science News said:

“Scientists have been incredibly successful in exploring and describing much of the world and universe. At Knowable Magazine, we want to provide a current picture of what’s known and what’s not known about important areas of research.”

For those of you coming to the WCSJ, here’s a snapshot of where you can find us and when.

If you need an additional reason to attend our “Meet the Knowable Editors” event (with chocolate) on Friday afternoon, then we are hoping to have an additional free item to give away to the first 100 people who show up.

Rosie Mestel, Deputy Editor for Knowable Magazine, will also be at the Unofficial Pop-Up Pitch Slam on Saturday, October 28.

You can sign up for further updates about Knowable Magazine and connect with Knowable Magazine on Facebook and Twitter.

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and benefit of society. Please visit the Annual Reviews Press Center to sign up for media-only access to journal content.

 

Warmest congratulations to JoAnne Stubbe – winner of the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

It’s always cause for celebration when someone you know wins a prize. For the Annual Review of Biochemistry, that person is JoAnne Stubbe, our Associate Editor who has won the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize which recognizes the accomplishments of outstanding women in science.

JoAnne was selected by The Rockefeller University to win this award for her work illuminating the mechanism of ribonucleotide reductase. She is the Novartis Professor of Chemistry, Emerita in MIT’s Department of Chemistry. Wellesley College president and renowned cardiologist and women’s health advocate Paula A. Johnson will present  the award in a ceremony at Rockefeller on Nov. 7 2017.

“It’s an incredible honor to be chosen to receive the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize — especially when I look at the extraordinary list of women who have received this award before me,” Stubbe says. “There were very few women in chemistry during the early years of my career, and while so much has changed, supporting and spotlighting the work of women scientists is still very important. My own mother and grandmother were strong, amazing women who encouraged me to pursue my passions, and I’m grateful to Dr. Greengard for creating such a special tribute to women in honor of his own mother.”

 JoAnne – all of us here at Annual Reviews hope that you enjoy the award ceremony, we thank you for your service to our nonprofit and on behalf of all women in science, we applaud your leadership.

First observations of gravitational waves from colliding neutron stars

Today, the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration, and its partners announced the first observation of gravitational-waves from a pair of inspiraling neutron stars. Electromagnetic emission from the resulting collision was also observed in multiple wavelength bands. This occured on August 17, 2017 and represents the first time a cosmic event was observed with both gravitational waves and light.

For those who would like to do some background reading on this historic observation, we’ve made this review article from the 2016 volume of the Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science freely available to read.

Electromagnetic Signatures of Neutron Star Mergers in the Advanced LIGO Era by Rodrigo Fernández, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA and Brian D. Metzger, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, California and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, USA.

 

Experts live here – congratulations to our Nobel Prize winning authors in Chemistry!

Our authors are on a roll this Nobel season!

Congratulations to our contributing authors Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson who share the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution.”

We’ve made their articles freely available to celebrate this achievement including: Low Temperature Electron MicroscopyRibosomes (3 articles); Enzymes (2 articles)

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and the benefit of society. To find out how we create our highly cited reviews and stimulate discussion about science, please watch this short video. Members of the media can visit our Press Center to sign up for journal access.

Experts live here – congratulations to our Nobel Prize winning authors in Physiology or Medicine!

Warmest congratulations to Michael W. Young, Michael Rosbash and Jeffrey C. Hall who share the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

These three US scientists won for discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling Circadian Rhythms also known as the body clock. All have written for us and we’ve made their articles freely available to celebrate this achievement including:

 

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and the benefit of society. To find out how we create our highly cited reviews and stimulate discussion about science, please watch this short video. Members of the media can visit our Press Center to sign up for journal access.

Experts live here – congratulations to our Nobel Prize winning authors in Physics!

Warmest congratulations to Annual Reviews contributing authors, Rainer Weiss and Kip S. Thorne, who share the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics with Barry C. Barish.

This trio of US scientists won for “decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves” which were first theorized by Albert Einstein.

We’ve made these two articles, Gravitational-Wave Astronomy and Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation from the Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics and other related content, freely available to read in recognition of this significant contribution to science.

Annual Reviews is a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and the benefit of society. To find out how we create our highly cited reviews and stimulate discussion about science, please watch this short video. Members of the media can visit our Press Center to sign up for journal access.

The Grand Finale – Farewell to Cassini

On September 15, 2017, Cassini will enter Saturn’s atmosphere and break into very small pieces before burning up entirely.  For the past 7 years, the satellite’s exploration of Saturn and its moons has resulted in valuable data and glorious images.  Now as it runs out of fuel it will begin it’s final mission—a deep dive into Saturn’s atmosphere sending data back to Earth for as long as it can.

Personally, I find it difficult to avoid anthropomorphizing these space vehicles, especially one I have observed closely for so long, and watching this final mission continues to be quite moving to me. The remarkable images of Saturn’s rings were my desktop background and I closely watched the craft travel to the moons. I followed Cassini’s Twitter feed (CassiniSaturn) and saw the images and data come in daily.  Now this week I watch it end, and as NASA said in one of their animations, Cassini will become part of Saturn itself.  (To see details and to watch the amazing animation, see NASA’s “Grand Finale Toolkit.”)

Here at Annual Reviews, our authors have been using the data from Cassini’s exploration of Saturn for many years, and we are highlighting some of those articles during the culmination of Cassini’s mission.

Thank you, Cassini.

spencer-cassiniEnceladus: An Active Ice World in the Saturn System” by John R. Spencer and Francis Nimmo.  Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Volume 41

Planetary Reorientation” by Isamu Matsuyama, Fancis Nimmo, and Jerry X. Mitrovica.  Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Volume 42

mitchell-cassiniThe Climate of Titan” by Jonathan L. Mitchell and Juan M. Lora Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Volume 44

Shape, Internal Structure, Zonal Winds, and Gravitational Field of Rapidly Rotating Jupiter-Like Planets” by Keke Zhang, Dali Kong, and Gerald Schubert.  Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Volume 45

Hayes-cassini

The Lakes and Seas of Titan” by Alexander G. Hayes Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Volume 44

 

 

 

Suzanne K. Moses is Annual Reviews’ Senior Electronic Content Coordinator. For 15+ years, she has played a central role in the publication of Annual Reviews’ online articles. Not a single page is posted online without first being proofed and quality checked by Suzanne.